Isometric question

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xcondeezex
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Isometric question

Postby xcondeezex » Thu Apr 09, 2009 7:32 pm

Would it be beneficial to train one isometric exercise every morning? For example on Monday do 4-6 sets of Overhead pressing from 3 joint angles one morning, then the next do the same only with a bent over towel pull. Continue this with a different exercise each day then start from the beginning at the beginning of the week or are mini workouts performed 3x a week better?
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Ross Enamait
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Re: Isometric question

Postby Ross Enamait » Thu Apr 09, 2009 7:40 pm

Depends on how often you'll repeat a given exercise. For example, suppose you target 6 exercises, therefore you only hit each exercise once a week. You won't receive significant strength gains per exercise with only a single day devoted to isometrics.

Often times, it is more useful to focus on fewer exercises, with greater volume per exercise. For example, I personally notice a greatest carryover when performing isometric work more frequently (ex. 3 days of overhead pressing via isometrics led to considerable gains for me).

Ross

mikasd
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Re: Isometric question

Postby mikasd » Thu Apr 09, 2009 8:17 pm

isometrics works alot better when done in volume imo

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TravisAG
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Re: Isometric question

Postby TravisAG » Thu Apr 09, 2009 9:00 pm

I was pondering this myself.. Like say you do Isometric Punches one day.. Then you focus on another 4 isometrics the next day and cycle like that so you won't Burn out your central nervous system while still getting Isometrics in every day.
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Intense
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Re: Isometric question

Postby Intense » Thu Apr 09, 2009 9:15 pm

You can do isometrics basically anywhere. Maybe you could devote some time in the mornings to certain movements then throughout the day do enough sets to significantly increase the volume. I do this often.

Your body doesn't understand complex routines or timing. If you do 5 sets of 5 second all out wall pushes spread over 8 hours your body will get stronger in that position. Actually it would be better than 5 sets of 5 with less rest(5+ minutes) so you get the best of both worlds. Less impact with more gain. Wall pushing is my favorite isometric exercise. Really should carry-over to the clinch better than most movements.

To be short...Greasing the groove + isometrics = specific strength gain with little net impact to muscle fatigue.
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bpc
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Re: Isometric question

Postby bpc » Fri Apr 10, 2009 9:55 am

I love isometrics! I've known about them for years and used to do them a long time ago. I read about them from a Frank Zane book and in one of Bruce Lee's books. Ross reminded me of them in Never Gymless and also presents some variations that I've never seen before.

I've been trying to do them 2-3 times per week like he suggests.

My question is, I notice that I hold my breath when I exert maximal effort and then my face fills up with blood feeling like it's going to explode Now, that's funny :mozilla_smile: Should I be breathing? It's only for 3-6 seconds or so.

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Re: Isometric question

Postby nicho » Sat Apr 11, 2009 9:47 am

bpc wrote:My question is, I notice that I hold my breath when I exert maximal effort and then my face fills up with blood feeling like it's going to explode Now, that's funny :mozilla_smile: Should I be breathing? It's only for 3-6 seconds or so.


I have a habit of forgetting to breathe too. I try to remember but most of the time I don't. Despite this, isometrics still have improved my strength more rapidly than any weights I've lifted. I've always been able to feel a difference in whatever movements I've been training with isos after just a few weeks of using them.

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Re: Isometric question

Postby NeilD » Sat Apr 11, 2009 11:08 am

hmmm GTG with isometrics is something I considered.. I thought isometrics were very stressfull to the CNS would that not lead to burnout? Genuinely am curious
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sn8ke01
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Re: Isometric question

Postby sn8ke01 » Sat Apr 11, 2009 11:16 am

Also consider putting Functional* Iso's into your tool box.
Using Functional Isometrics in an Isotonic Strength Training Program

Christian Thibaudeau discuss Functional Iso here:
Continuum Training

*And the word "Functional" here is a pronoun - it does not mean that other iso's are NOT functional.
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Intense
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Re: Isometric question

Postby Intense » Sat Apr 11, 2009 12:19 pm

I go basically from memory now but i am confident isometrics is the least damaging type of "lift" and at the same time the best way to build pure strength. 100% isometric lifting activates 5% more muscle fiber than a concentric 1rm or eccentric i forget...point is it activates 5% more than the 2nd best lift. Something like 89% 91% for concentric/eccentric and its up near 96 for isometric.
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