Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Discuss boxing techniques, strategy, drills, and preparation
IrishD
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2017 4:09 pm

Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby IrishD » Tue Jan 10, 2017 2:30 pm

Hi guys,

I've been a big fan of the forums for a while so I've decided to register as I'm looking for help.

I'm a novice boxer who's struggling for fitness. I can spar 2 rounds but after that I'm struggling. I train in the boxing gym 3 times a week. What should I be doing on the days off from the gym? Should I go the gym for extra work on the bags etc as the best way to get fit for your sport is well, to practice your sport!

Or should I be doing sprint work / interval work and or long distance runs? There's so much conflicting information on line I don't know what to do?

Any feedback from actual boxers / boxing coaches / S&C coaches who work with competitive boxers.

Thanks in advance.

ID.




Mr. Churro
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2015 8:11 am

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby Mr. Churro » Tue Jan 10, 2017 9:42 pm

From your description it sounds like you need to work on your gas tank. Think of your anaerobic systems, the name is misleading because the atp-cp and lactic acid system need oxygen ask any 400m runner, as your ability to perform in the ring over the course of a round, and your aerobic system as your ability to recover between rounds, and continue to put out high energy over the course of a fight. As an amateur, you don't need as much aerobic capacity as a pro because of the shorter fights, but it's still something useful to work on. If you go out and do a bunch of hill sprints or bag punch outs, I doubt your 3rd round performance will improve, as those anaerobic efforts will only improve your stamina over the course of a round or so.

My advice is to do some steady state jogging on your off days. A bike is even better because of the low impact nature you won't risk injury as much as running. Try to stay in zone 4 for this endurance work as that is the best way to improve your aerobic capacity. You can calculate your zones for running online just google it.

However, don't throw out anaerobic conditioning. That type of work will greatly improve your in round performance. For example if you stun an opponent and want to try and close the show, your ability to maintain a high punch output and high power for a minute or so is valuable, and that comes from anaerobic conditioning. If all you did was aerobic work you'd be ok, but you'll lack that explosive flurry ability and pressure that comes from good anaerobic conditioning.

So just to give you an idea here's what a week might look like.

Day 1: boxing
Day 2: aerobic zone 4 work, ex.10k run
Day 3: boxing
Day 4: aerobic zone 4 work, ex. 20k bike
Day 5: boxing
Day 6: anaerobic conditioning, ex. Hill sprints
Day 7: rest and recovery

I'd put your anaerobic conditioning on the last day because it allows you to really go balls to the wall and not have to worry about being fresh the next day. Not to mention anaerobic conditioning really taxes the body so you'll want a day of rest afterwards.

Hope this helps, happy training!

IrishD
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2017 4:09 pm

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby IrishD » Wed Jan 11, 2017 1:28 pm

Mr. Churro wrote:From your description it sounds like you need to work on your gas tank. Think of your anaerobic systems, the name is misleading because the atp-cp and lactic acid system need oxygen ask any 400m runner, as your ability to perform in the ring over the course of a round, and your aerobic system as your ability to recover between rounds, and continue to put out high energy over the course of a fight. As an amateur, you don't need as much aerobic capacity as a pro because of the shorter fights, but it's still something useful to work on. If you go out and do a bunch of hill sprints or bag punch outs, I doubt your 3rd round performance will improve, as those anaerobic efforts will only improve your stamina over the course of a round or so.

My advice is to do some steady state jogging on your off days. A bike is even better because of the low impact nature you won't risk injury as much as running. Try to stay in zone 4 for this endurance work as that is the best way to improve your aerobic capacity. You can calculate your zones for running online just google it.

However, don't throw out anaerobic conditioning. That type of work will greatly improve your in round performance. For example if you stun an opponent and want to try and close the show, your ability to maintain a high punch output and high power for a minute or so is valuable, and that comes from anaerobic conditioning. If all you did was aerobic work you'd be ok, but you'll lack that explosive flurry ability and pressure that comes from good anaerobic conditioning.

So just to give you an idea here's what a week might look like.

Day 1: boxing
Day 2: aerobic zone 4 work, ex.10k run
Day 3: boxing
Day 4: aerobic zone 4 work, ex. 20k bike
Day 5: boxing
Day 6: anaerobic conditioning, ex. Hill sprints
Day 7: rest and recovery

I'd put your anaerobic conditioning on the last day because it allows you to really go balls to the wall and not have to worry about being fresh the next day. Not to mention anaerobic conditioning really taxes the body so you'll want a day of rest afterwards.

Hope this helps, happy training!



Hi Mr. Churro, firstly let me thank you for a fantastic detailed reply to my questions. I really appreciate it.

A few questions if that's ok?

Could I substitute the 20k cycle with another 10k run or some swimming? If so, have you any experience of swimming routines for amateur boxers?

Also the hill sprints on day 6 - Could I replace this with track work? If so, would you be able to recommend a track running programme?

Thanks very much in advance.

Mr. Churro
Posts: 256
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2015 8:11 am

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby Mr. Churro » Fri Jan 13, 2017 12:51 am

Your aerobic endurance stuff can be almost anything really. As long as you keep it your body in around zone 4 you can swim, jog, bike, whatever. Back when I boxed in hs i would use skills training as a form of aerobic cardio. One thing I brought over from my experience in Shorin-ryu karate was using katas. I remember having to perform lots of these routines every time when I was being promoted a belt. Using this concept I would take sequences from the boxing gym and turn them into a kind of shadowboxing kata if you will. One of my best combinations was a double jab, right cross, slip, liver shot, slip, movement. So on the days i was doing my steady state runs, I would finish my run with 30-45 minutes of drilling combinations and sequences I learned in the gym and from sparring. For example, if i was in the gym and I threw a really good combo or sequence in sparring, I would remember exactly what it was and drill it during those post run shadowboxing sessions. These shadowboxing katas I did at a moderate pace keeping my heart rate at around zone 4 and focusing on absolutely perfect form. You have to make sure that if you're going to do this kind of drilling that your form is perfect because otherwise it will instill bad motor patterns. These sessions not only helped my endurance, but also were a way of getting some skills training in too. Just some other Ideas.

Now, I don't box anymore but I can shed some light on endurance training as I am a competitive cyclist and triathlete. Swimming is awesome as it is low impact, and will condition your upper body which is helpful for boxing. However, if you don't have prior swim experience, don't bother. Technique is SO important in swimming and if you start logging yardage with bad technique, you will screw up your shoulders guaranteed. And screwed up shoulders is really bad news for a boxer. You can do technique drills to help improve your stroke, but you're not training to be a swimmer, you're training to be a boxer so you could be using your time elsewhere. So as far as swimming goes, do it if you have semi decent stroke form and you can work on it a bit as you train, but if you're new to swimming, or don't have much experience, id skip it. This is not to turn you off swimming of course, I love swimming it is so peaceful and relaxing and trains your whole body. Not to mention it is a really valuable life skill. But in your case, you're simply trying to be the best boxer you can be, so spending a bunch of time honing your stroke is kinda pointless right now, but maybe something to look into down the road. If you do end up swimming I'd highly encourage you to warm-up and cool down before and after every session with lots of shoulder mobility work and make sure you do some rotator cuff stuff as well to prevent swimmers shoulder.

I'd still like to recommend cycling as, from my own experiences and the information i've seen, its the best way to improve your cardio. There is a reason that the list of highest ever recorded Vo2 Max numbers of all time is dominated by pro cyclists. Just nothing compares to 15% grade hill climbs, 120% V02 max time trial sessions etc. in terms of building iron lungs. However, cycling is SUPER expensive so beware of getting hooked on a costly hobby. But some slow zone 4 mileage on a cheap mountain bike is good too, and you don't NEED to spend a ton of money on gear.

The last day is simply supposed to be anaerobic conditioning, so hill sprints, track work, sledgehammer swings, tabata intervals all that stuff could be used. Hill sprints however are a staple in most fighters' training plans for a reason as they are brutal and effective. Track work is awesome too. I posted some track workouts in a cardio thread we had in the S&C section here, so if want to dig those up there is some really good workouts. However, right now in your training, I dont think you need super complex track workouts. I'd say 400m repeats are perfect for your needs. If you really want to mix it up do some pyramid or ladder training like this

200m
rest same as 200m interval duration
400m
rest same as 400m interval duration
600m
rest same as 600m interval duration
400m
rest same as 400m interval duration
200m

these are just some ideas if your training started getting stale. Lots of options for progression too by playing with your rest intervals and intensities and interval duration. Honestly though, something really simple though like 10x400m with 400m walking active recovery sounds like what you need. I do have a whole training log book full of all kinds of nasty run, swim and bike workouts so if you do want some I'm happy to oblige.

Hope this helps, happy training!

kingsimba
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 3:15 pm

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby kingsimba » Sun Feb 12, 2017 4:55 pm

Easy - hit the heavy bag. Twice a week. And do burpees if you really want.

Day 1 - Tabatas - 20 seconds on, 10 seconds off - 4 mins of work - 3 rounds.
The key: Go as hard as you possibly can (*the* key) while maintaining good form. Your goal is output (volume + power / speed). Don't slack or your conditioning will pay.

Day 2 - Combinations - 5 rounds:
Practice hitting the bag with your favourite combinations. I usually warm up with cycles of: 1, 1-2, 1-2-1, 1-2-1-2, 1-2-3, 1-2-3 (body), 1-2(body)-3, 2-3-2. And then mix them up for the remaining rounds.

Day 3 (optional) - 100 burpees for time. Work your way up to this one and try to beat last weeks time.


Should be all you need. Road work and all that shit is good if you're fighting 12 rounds and is not efficient use of time for amateur boxers.

dzab
Posts: 237
Joined: Sun May 30, 2010 3:32 am

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby dzab » Thu Feb 16, 2017 12:43 am

How long have you been training?

You can have 'elite' fitness, yet the pressure of sparring/competition can still gas you. This only goes away with experience.

Marciano
Posts: 411
Joined: Sun May 07, 2006 5:12 pm

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby Marciano » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:41 am

Focus on boxing skill, lots of sparring, bagwork, shadow boxing. If time is limited dont focus on heavy fitness drills, running hills and roads doesnt win fights, so focus on whats most important, skill specific work. Work on everything skill related as much as possible, and you will have a huge advantage, you'l get fit actually sparring good rounds and pushing the pace on the bagwork, but as the skill improves that's where you'l see everything improve.

kingsimba
Posts: 616
Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 3:15 pm

Re: Novice competive boxer - Improving fitness.

Postby kingsimba » Sat Feb 18, 2017 9:06 pm

dzab wrote:How long have you been training?

You can have 'elite' fitness, yet the pressure of sparring/competition can still gas you. This only goes away with experience.


Word. However, I do find having confidence in your gas tank allows you to handle the mental pressure much better. Pretty much summed up by the B-Hop 'I always come in to my fights overconfident' thing.


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