Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

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Jesse
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Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby Jesse » Thu May 14, 2015 1:31 pm

This was recommended on another board and I'm in the process of reading it. It was good enough already to go ahead and link it. YMMV.

http://quadrant.org.au/magazine/2010/01 ... n-of-arms/




judoka
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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby judoka » Tue Jun 23, 2015 3:43 pm

I'm not really into philosophy so some of it went over my head. I liked it over all though.

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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby Faust » Thu Jul 02, 2015 9:28 am

A great article you shared!

Being prepared to lay your life on the line doesn't come by accident.

Being a fan of Epictetus myself, I'd love to say that stoicsm is a noble mindset but I'm afraid such philosophy tends to create loners and living it would make it almost impossible to love others with full commitment, e.g. such as your family. In my opinion Stoicism creates an insurmountable distance between the stoic and his fellow beings. A tad too idealistic for me.

it is my unshakeable belief that when . . . two intrinsic values—the total acceptance of death as a natural condition of life, and the total acceptance of an absolute moral code—are combined, the Warrior becomes invincible.


Reading this quote made me think is displays the very djihadist mindset, doesn't it?

Think on...
Read Nietzsche

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Jesse
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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby Jesse » Thu Jul 02, 2015 8:43 pm

Honestly it shares the mindset of many different types of religious warriors. However the difference between someone that would happily kill others to gain servants in paradise and someone who would happily and without thought for themselves run towards the sound of gunfire to do whatever it takes to save someone else...that difference is extreme. It comes down to what religion you're following.

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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby Faust » Sun Jul 05, 2015 8:50 am

Sorry for getting back at you this late, but work is killing me right now...

Of course you're right, moral codes and objectives differ and there are those that are unacceptable, without doubt!

The stoic mindset still demands to let go everything that is not within you and I can't see this possible for anyone, except the true sociopathic being.
IMO the far more viable warrior mentality could be the comprehension of the necessity of his determination. Or to be philosophical with Hegel: Freedom is the truth of necessity.
Read Nietzsche

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sculls
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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby sculls » Fri Oct 09, 2015 6:15 am

I recently got into Stoic philosophy. A good introduction is this book: http://www.amazon.com/Guide-Good-Life-A ... +Stoic+Joy

There are a lot of miscoceptions about Stoic philosophy. Resulting from that it is not popular and therefore not well known in our times. And that it goes against the philosophical mainstream of "elightened hedonism". I think its lack of popularity is also due to the fact that it doesn't offer a cookie cutter ideology.

E.g. as a Stoic you don't have to value nothing outside yourself, it's IMO rather about only valuing the few things that are really important and being prepared to let everything else go if you must. Stoicism doesn't turn you into a cynic stand-off jerk as well, it rather advises you to get involved only where it really counts, but if then with full effort.

Stoicism isn't for everyone and that's OK. It's rather for certain personality types. I'm a INTJ on the Myers-Briggs scale (https://type-coach.com/types/intj) and I'm tailor made for it. On the consumerism side of the issue, which I found generates the most of debate when I talk with other ppl about it, I'm the guy who owns three pairs of shoes and buys new clothes only every few years. I also honestly don't know what items I lack every year and should wish for Christmas, so following this philosophy is easy for me. If the thought of having to give up your gourmet and wine hobby or not buying a new car or firearm every half year appals you, it's not for you.
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Train congruently! (not much of a catchphrase but a great concept)
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ktob
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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby ktob » Sun Nov 01, 2015 2:08 pm

I try to be more Stoic like in life. I especially like these articles-

http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2011/10/ ... olid-gold/
The next great trick is the one that allows you to eliminate anxiety about the present and the future. That can be done by separating your worries into things you can control, and things you can’t. Some people worry endlessly about politics and world events – so much that it affects their ability to lead a happy life, even when in reality, world politics barely even affect their lives here in the cushioned and prosperous rich world! The Stoic solution to this is to realize that politics and the actions of other countries are completely outside of your circle of influence – so you can breathe easily and completely drop all worry about them. There is a smaller subset of these events that you CAN influence – who you vote for, and possibly where you donate your money or time. To eliminate the rest of your worry, make the votes and take the local actions, and then you can be 100% worry free.


^^This has taken SO much stress out of my life. Politics, sports and worldwide events have almost zero impact in my life now. At one time I watched a bunch of news programs, listened to talk radio and watched all the major sporting events…. Always revving me up and looking for an outlet (Facebook, RossTraining, family gatherings) to unleash my fury about the corrupt government, pitiful Jets/Mets, or stupid people. What a waste. I am much happier now and I know nothing about whats going on outside of a few podcasts that I listen to and water cooler talk at work.

Moving from the mental to the physical, Stoics actually enjoy experimenting with Voluntary Discomfort. As a contemporary Stoic, you might make a point of seeing how long you can leave the air conditioning off on a summer day, or try hiking in bare feet instead of shoes occasionally to feel the land and force your feet to adapt to tougher conditions than a moisture-wicking merino wool hiking sock. It sounds absurd by modern standards, until you realize that by doing this, you are actually broadening your comfort zone, even while you eliminate your fear of discomfort. Thanks to the practice above, you are now able to enjoy yourself in a much broader range of temperatures, and appreciate the comfort of shoes when you do have them. Meanwhile, a person with the extreme opposite philosophy might become irritated if he ever has to travel in less than a first-class airplane seat or stay in less than a five star hotel or drink sub-$500-per-bottle wine. By experimenting with voluntary discomfort, we learn to appreciate far more of our life, and can be content with a much simpler and more wholesome one.


http://www.marksdailyapple.com/7-ways-t ... z3puuAZAf1
Think of living with boundaries as managing your investments – your time and energy investments. If you give all your time and energy away to ancillary purposes or unhelpful emotions (e.g. anger, resentment, worry), you’ll have nothing left for the central vision and people in your life. Maybe Grok didn’t worry about a central vision, but he also didn’t field the eight zillion inputs, tasks and notifications that we do in a day. If it’s a contest of who is more at risk of mis-living a life, I’m going to vote for the modern every time.

Consider which relationships and endeavors sustain your equanimity, foster your well-being, serve your overarching vision in life. Invest in these. Let the rest go, or mindfully give budgeted amounts to other interests and circles as you reasonably can. There’s nothing wrong with selectivity. No person can or should be responsible for everything and everyone in the universe. To be a useful presence in the world, we need to be balanced people. We can’t become or sustain that by being at the whim of others’ demands, judgments or suggestion.

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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby pathfighter » Wed Nov 04, 2015 12:09 am

Jesse wrote:Honestly it shares the mindset of many different types of religious warriors. However the difference between someone that would happily kill others to gain servants in paradise and someone who would happily and without thought for themselves run towards the sound of gunfire to do whatever it takes to save someone else...that difference is extreme. It comes down to what religion you're following.


I follow Islam, Jesse. You think I believe that bullshit you posted above?
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Jesse
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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby Jesse » Sun Nov 08, 2015 5:39 am

Doesn't bother me one way or the other. I stand by the statement.

I'm not trying to start something, but the observation is not untrue. There are parallel ideas in common both in stoicism and christianity. I am a "fundamental christian" and that has led me to move overseas and spend my life helping the disabled and others in another country. I can't tell you what I would do in a crisis, because I haven't been in one. I haven't seen the elephant so to speak. However, I have trained to protect myself, my family, and the innocent. The people I look up to are those who have run toward gunfire to protect those around them and I want to be the kind of person that would also...and that's a direct outflow of my religious beliefs. "Fundamental christian" just means that you hold to the fundamentals of the faith and that...firmly so that they have directly influenced your life and actions in a noticeable way. You then look at "fundamental muslims" and you find a boatload of terrorists and imams with knives in their hands during their sermons.

Oh wait what about Hitler and the crusades? What about people who have committed atrocities in the name of Christianity. Seriously? Someone using a twisted messed up interpretation in order to justify being thugs and worse does not in any way change the original message. The message itself is what matters and the direct fruits are obvious.

pathfighter
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Re: Article on Stoic Philosophy and the Profession of Arms

Postby pathfighter » Thu Nov 12, 2015 5:40 pm

Jesse wrote:Doesn't bother me one way or the other. I stand by the statement.

I'm not trying to start something, but the observation is not untrue. There are parallel ideas in common both in stoicism and christianity. I am a "fundamental christian" and that has led me to move overseas and spend my life helping the disabled and others in another country. I can't tell you what I would do in a crisis, because I haven't been in one. I haven't seen the elephant so to speak. However, I have trained to protect myself, my family, and the innocent. The people I look up to are those who have run toward gunfire to protect those around them and I want to be the kind of person that would also...and that's a direct outflow of my religious beliefs. "Fundamental christian" just means that you hold to the fundamentals of the faith and that...firmly so that they have directly influenced your life and actions in a noticeable way. You then look at "fundamental muslims" and you find a boatload of terrorists and imams with knives in their hands during their sermons.

Oh wait what about Hitler and the crusades? What about people who have committed atrocities in the name of Christianity. Seriously? Someone using a twisted messed up interpretation in order to justify being thugs and worse does not in any way change the original message. The message itself is what matters and the direct fruits are obvious.


We ought to have a conversation offline so you can understand what I do for the innocent. I can't describe it here as it would identify me.

I find it curious that you are so quick to dismiss atrocities done in the name of Christianity or by Christians. You ought to apply the same interpretation to people that commit crimes in the name if Islam. They are thugs and villains too, in the eyes of most Muslims.
jimlang wrote: Bunch a burpee lovin' dorks...


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