wing chun

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speedy
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Re: wing chun

Postby speedy » Fri Apr 29, 2016 7:48 am

I agree and disagree too. Yes there was some carry over from traditional to full-contact but that carry over was very minimal. With kickboxing I already knew how to punch and kick, but what I didn't know was how to kick and punch with power for in traditional we are trained to stay within 2-inches of our target. For that reason I spent 1 solid month on the heavy bags till it became a natural act. I spent 3-months getting my ass handed to me in the ring till I started winning fights and note I walked into that gym as a black belt. Granted I admit belts don't mean diddly-squat. Just saying walked in there with a lot of experience but very raw to what I was training for.

Secondly, when I went to boxing I did a lot of blocks from traditional days due to it being so drilled into my being; it's a natural reaction. It took A LOT of effort to undo 12-years of training in a month but I did it.

Also, your mentions of limitations to boxing and kickboxing is true IF you are comparing it to MMA. But I have to say, if you are talking about fighting in general (not MMA) but a street fight to protecting yourself based on what I experienced it really doesn't get any better than boxing.

With that said, if I were to ever train MMA me personally I would train at a boxing gym over a kickboxing gym and do BJJ too. My experience if you become a better fighter and puncher from true boxing trainers. BJJ is so you are not lost if it goes to the ground. Kicking helps but I am confident many fighters can win a fight without ever throwing a single kick. Not saying it's useless just IMHO not as important than learning to do stand-up and ground fighting. It's something you can try to fit in when you can IMHO. In the end nothing beats a well rounded fighter which IMHO the best ever was St Pierre.




dalesr
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Re: wing chun

Postby dalesr » Fri Apr 29, 2016 9:50 am

I suppose that's dependant on who you learn from. My Tae Kwon Do days were much like you say, not actually making much contact and using very little power when you did; which I think was of benefit to me as a child, however the guys who coached me in Karate were much more realistic, one was a former Thai Boxer and both were BJJ purple belts at a time when people training BJJ were very few and far between (we used to travel 3 hours to the black belt) We also had a few military guys at the club that liked to push it; I was probably quite lucky in where I trained.
I'm also lucky now, as the guy heading up the Wing Chun club is open to different ideas and styles and doesn't hold the commonly held (in trad MA circles) backward idea that their one style is able to beat all others :mozilla_foot: He's actually asked about holds, chokes etc. that can be incorporated into the system, so in my mind that's a good mentality! Trust me, I've walked into many gyms/dojos etc over the years and walked rapidly back out on witnessing the crap being taught and the backward mentality of the instructors.

Nobody punches better than a boxer, that's pretty irrefutable.

I agree with your point about some people being able to win fights without throwing a single kick, I've been witness to it many times; then again I've seen fights won purely from powerful well placed kicks without a single punch been thrown.
All martial Arts have limitations, as I said its all relative to what you are doing with what, an MMA fighter in a boxing match isn't well placed, nobody would do much against a 50cal.

However Wing Chun isn't a competitive martial art and I don't approach it as such, in fact that's what appealed to me, for the time being I don't have that competitive MA mind set anymore.
I'm confident that with my existing knowledge base I can take some positives from Wing Chun to add to my abilities and enjoy the process at the same time.

GSP was/is? awesome and he's always been right at the top of my favourite pound for pound fighters, completely well rounded and kept away from most of the trash talking.

finnegan
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Re: wing chun

Postby finnegan » Fri Apr 29, 2016 6:18 pm

Bottom line whether its karate, kung fu boxing or bjj if you like it, if it enriches your life and makes us a better person then embrace and devour it.

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speedy
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Re: wing chun

Postby speedy » Fri Apr 29, 2016 9:02 pm

finnegan wrote:Bottom line whether its karate, kung fu boxing or bjj if you like it, if it enriches your life and makes us a better person then embrace and devour it.

YES SENSEI!

dalesr
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Re: wing chun

Postby dalesr » Sat Apr 30, 2016 2:11 am

finnegan wrote:Bottom line whether its karate, kung fu boxing or bjj if you like it, if it enriches your life and makes us a better person then embrace and devour it.


Well said!

Canis Caelorum
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Re: wing chun

Postby Canis Caelorum » Mon May 02, 2016 5:06 pm

My old man used to coach Wing Chun - he was a sifu or whatever they call it. My original martial arts background was in MT as a lad. I remember wanting to do some WC vs MT sparring, and some NHB sparring with him, and he just flat out told me I'd whoop his ass. I was really surprised actually, kind of thought to myself "well why bother doing something if it isn't practical?".

It wasn't until later when I developed an interest in koryu kenjutsu that I began to appreciate sometimes people just like to be part of preserving an art form, regardless of practicality. Art, especially martial arts, has such cultural heritage and mechanical beauty to it that it is now entirely understandable to me that people continue it's lineage simply as a preservation of these elements, in full knowledge that it doesn't "work", but with that being irrelevant.
With respect

M.O.B.F.O.E. - Money Over Bitches, Fitness Over Everything

Canis Caelorum
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Re: wing chun

Postby Canis Caelorum » Mon May 02, 2016 5:13 pm

finnegan wrote:Bottom line whether its karate, kung fu boxing or bjj if you like it, if it enriches your life and makes us a better person then embrace and devour it.


Oss!
With respect

M.O.B.F.O.E. - Money Over Bitches, Fitness Over Everything

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MarkoCain
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Re: wing chun

Postby MarkoCain » Sat May 14, 2016 4:31 pm

I also did WC for about 12 years. I got a lot out of it and found it highly enjoyable. It didn't make me a fighter but it took away any fear of being in a confrontation (I'm talking on the street here, I never fought in the ring or competition).
I realise that confidence and false confidence are two separate things but the training gave me some sort of belief in my ability to defend myself and even though I may have been tested only a couple of times, when I had no other option, like getting away or talking the situation down, I did come out on top. Admittedly, drunken bullies are not a true test of anybody's abilities.
WC for me was an interesting journey, it's real world and competition capabilities may be limited but it was a good time personally while I studied it. Almost cathartic. I only stopped because the school with which I trained seemed to change direction a bit after the sad death of Sifu Jim Fung.
I have many fond memories of demonstrations given by him, his sifu, Tsui Seung Tin (also sadly gone now) and the senior instructors. These were highly skilled men in the WC world. They may well be useless in the realm of todays MMA fighters but the level of power they could generate was very impressive nonetheless.
If you enjoy it for what it is then that is a good thing and certainly beats sitting in front of the TV doing nothing.

Mr. Churro
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Re: wing chun

Postby Mr. Churro » Sat May 14, 2016 5:54 pm

Not saying I agree, or disagree, just thought I'd link this in the interest of adding in some counter arguments.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=tmUBQvy9kno

Guy has a few good points, a few garbage points. Imo comparing any ONE system to mma doesn't make sense. Mma is MIXED martial arts, I think there are some interesting and useful techniques in wing chun that an mma fighter might find useful. To become the most well rounded mma fighter, take what works from every system and scrap what doesn't. I think most systems have some beneficial ideas and tactics that can mesh well and compliment other systems. Just my 2 cents.

finnegan
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Re: wing chun

Postby finnegan » Sat May 14, 2016 6:17 pm

Painful video to watch.

That guys cluelessness hurts.


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