primitive rural living for conditioning

Ask strength and conditioning questions or share your knowledge.
brickmasonjoe
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby brickmasonjoe » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:20 am

Nothing beats it.. Yesterday I walked 10 miles at work. I have a tracker.. The dumpster was at least couple hundred feet away... I have carrying heavy items to it all day.. I worked out in the morning and after work as well. There are people in the gym who out perform me like nothing and there are some guys on the job that can out work me.. But I have a very high work capacity, and I owe it to manual labor, and the sandbag training.

I do take way longer to add reps and weight to my training though. Thats partly due to my diet.




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Snaplight
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby Snaplight » Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:36 am

Also don't discount the fact modern Central Heating plays in making us less rugged.
Colder temps mean your body BMR is constantly raised.

Office living with desk bound jobs is not a good thing in physical terms.

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RepublicJim
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Location: Republic, WA

Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby RepublicJim » Thu May 02, 2019 10:58 am

Last evening I did some more mowing with my reel mower, then broke out the scythe for the first time this year. I'm working my way out from the yard and starting to clear tall grass and weeds in our fields. A sharp scythe blade makes a world of difference! However, it's obvious that proper technique is quite important too, and I'm far from experienced with it. When I occasionally "got it" it showed in the way the weeds neatly dropped with minimal effort. More often though, I was taking uneven swipes with it and using my arms too much instead of rotating at the waist. Skill will come with practice. Even so, it was fun and relaxing clearing weeds and mowing without any roar of machinery or gas fumes, all while getting a slow and steady, moderate amount of physical activity. My property should look better this summer than it has in years and I will continue to enjoy and benefit from the lifestyle.
pathfighter wrote:Keep at it. People may not listen to regular madmen, but they do listen to jacked madmen.

pathfighter
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby pathfighter » Fri May 03, 2019 1:05 pm

I think that's fantastic, Jim.

One quick note-- I don't think you're supposed to rotate at the waist while using a scythe. I think your hips are supposed to stay square relative to your torso, and you rather bend and twist your legs and feet to generate the rotating motion. Rotating at the waist will get you spinal problems and back pain.
jimlang wrote: Bunch a burpee lovin' dorks...

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RepublicJim
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby RepublicJim » Fri May 03, 2019 4:47 pm

pathfighter wrote:One quick note-- I don't think you're supposed to rotate at the waist while using a scythe. I think your hips are supposed to stay square relative to your torso, and you rather bend and twist your legs and feet to generate the rotating motion. Rotating at the waist will get you spinal problems and back pain.

True enough, I did not phrase that well. I was thinking about rotating the whole body rather than swinging with the arms, and carelessly typed "waist". Thanks for correcting that. I do not encourage anyone to do repetitive rotation from the waist. There are some fairly good YouTube videos of proper scything technique, so I will continue to study them and practice in the field (literally).
pathfighter wrote:Keep at it. People may not listen to regular madmen, but they do listen to jacked madmen.

pathfighter
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby pathfighter » Sun May 05, 2019 5:50 pm

Jim, you continue to impress and inspire. I find myself consciously appreciating everyday tasks as exercise that I would not have thought of that way were it not for this thread!
jimlang wrote: Bunch a burpee lovin' dorks...

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RepublicJim
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby RepublicJim » Sat May 11, 2019 12:32 pm

Thanks. Every village needs an idiot, and when I talk about scything, most of my friends think I fill that role. :mozilla_wink:

This morning I went out before breakfast to do some scything before it got hot. I have a section that's roughly an eighth of an acre that I'm working on cleaning up. All the tall standing weeds are down now, but I still have a lot of long matted down grass that I have to rake up and cut, since it has not been done in several years. It's a slow, gradual process and I know my technique still sucks. I'm starting to get it though, and also getting the blade sharpened better. It's amazing how well the scythe works even on uneven ground and in thick weeds. Now I'm taking a break and getting some food before I get out my trusty old push reel mower for a few hours of mowing my yard and fields. Today is definitely a great low-intensity work capacity-building type of day!
pathfighter wrote:Keep at it. People may not listen to regular madmen, but they do listen to jacked madmen.

brickmasonjoe
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby brickmasonjoe » Mon May 13, 2019 5:37 am

^ My brother had a few trees cut down by an arborist friend of ours... He did it for free and my brother has TONS of wood.

He's so lucky, I'd be chopping a few pieces of wood a night for extra exercise.. But he wants to rent a splitter. Some people don't know what they have.

Wrestler
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby Wrestler » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:39 pm

Rural living is good for overall toughness I think but there is a difference between doing work and training. The difference is that training is timed and therefore requires stamina and intense concentration. So splitting g wood with an ax at a slow pace and taking frequent breaks is totally different than constant hitting with no breaks.

pathfighter
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Re: primitive rural living for conditioning

Postby pathfighter » Mon Jun 10, 2019 12:06 pm

Wrestler wrote:Rural living is good for overall toughness I think but there is a difference between doing work and training. The difference is that training is timed and therefore requires stamina and intense concentration. So splitting g wood with an ax at a slow pace and taking frequent breaks is totally different than constant hitting with no breaks.


It's a different pace of work and puts different metabolic demands on you. Speaking of cardiovasular fitness, being able to work for prolonged periods in zone 1/2 builds a fantastic base for more intense work. That's why ultra runners talk about about "time on your feet" as being just as important as time "training". Let me give you an example. Lately, I've been training my 1st grader to prep for a multi-day hut hike in the mountains, so we've been doing a lot of hiking. So a 10 mile / 4000 fit vertical gain route that I would normally run in 2.5 hours now takes me 6 hours because kid. So I'm going slower, lower heart rate, barely sweating, but it's EXHAUSTING. I feel more tired afterwards than when I run it. The cool part is that all this slow hiking is actually making me better at running. My 8-10 mile runs feel like they go by super fast and my aerobic fitness is better.
jimlang wrote: Bunch a burpee lovin' dorks...


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